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Connecticut Fence Laws & Guidelines

Feb 25 2018   |   By: Mike Dominique   |   Posted in: Vinyl Fencing, Uncategorized, Privacy

 

Good Fences Make Good Neighbors: The Connecticut Fence Laws & Guidelines

Maybe you just got a new dog and want to be sure that it doesn't run into the street, or you want to worry less about your kids. Maybe you want more privacy from your nosey neighbor, whatever the reason, fences are certainly a huge help when it comes to keeping things in or out of your yard and out of mind.

As fences can be used for good, they can also be used for evil, or at least perceived evil anyways. That's why when you have a fence built you need to be sure that you are following the laws local guidelines regarding fences. Otherwise, you could face having to tear it down, or even civil liability in extreme cases.

Permits

In most Connecticut towns, you only need a building permit to put in a fence if it is over six feet high. However, different neighborhoods, towns, and municipalities do require permits.

Always check with your towns building department before embarking on a fence install. But just because you may not need a permit doesn’t mean that you’re in the clear, especially if you live in one of Connecticut’s Historic Districts.

Regulations and Ordnances

Here again, there are variations on what can and cannot be built depending on your location. It’s generally required that you only have a four feet tall fence from the front of your house towards the road and you are limited to no higher than six feet in the back yard. Also beware if you live on a corner lot because you technically have two front yards and cannot have anything taller than 4’ high along two sides of your house. Lastly, you must be aware of any property setbacks, gas lines, right of ways and Home Owner Association rules.

So be careful when you build that fence. Any time spent making sure the fence is legal under Connecticut law will save you money in the long run. As Robert Frost wrote, good fences make good neighbors, but a good, legal fence will really cement that relationship.

Happy Fencing!



 


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